America, we need to talk.

This is not a political blog. I have no intention of making this a platform for a partisan agenda. This is a place to share and reflect on our health journey, and I want it to remain a safe place for people and families who are struggling, regardless of your politics.

But there are some things we need to talk about.

There are some very, very scary things brewing in the world of healthcare legislation. And unless you are independently and exorbitantly wealthy, they will affect YOU, no matter what kind of insurance you have.

I don’t pretend to have a perfect answer, and I’m not here to argue the finer points of any politician or party’s proposed (or as-yet-still-not-proposed) plans. What I can do is talk about our experience navigating the current healthcare system, and how some of the current protections and impending changes affect and/or could potentially affect my family – real people who, if you’re reading this, you may very well actually know, and whom you might even like a little bit.

Let’s start with a couple of basics:

  • We currently have protection against lifetime limits on benefits.

In 2009, the year before the ACA banned lifetime dollar limits on healthcare coverage, around 59% of American workers had insurance plans with lifetime maximum benefits, many with limits of $2 million or less. That may sound like a lot of money, but 131 days in the NICU is really, really, insanely expensive. My son’s bills had surpassed $3 million before he ever came home from the hospital.

Since then, he’s had 8 additional surgeries, daily intravenous nutrition for most of three years, daily home nursing visits (at least as billed – but that’s a long, ranty story for another day), and so many readmissions I’ve lost count. That’s not a cliché; I’ve actually lost count. Last month we got a bill for $55K for part of his last big surgery. That one had been improperly processed as a denial and was quickly taken care of, but if our (employer-based, not ACA) insurance were allowed to deny us coverage after we hit a specified lifetime limit, we would currently be in financial ruin and unable to afford L’s care, let alone anything that might arise in the future.

  • We currently have protection against being denied coverage due to pre-existing conditions.

img_6138L is a walking pre-existing condition. His condition existed before he ever even emerged into this world. Insurance companies used to be allowed to deny people like L coverage simply because he got the shit end of the randomly-occurring congenital lottery (through no fault of mine and certainly through no fault of his own); if that were still the case, my husband would be unable to change jobs, we would be royally screwed if he got laid off or if his employer decided to change insurers, and once L is old enough to age out of our insurance coverage, he would be financially ruined before he was even given a chance to try his hand at this whole adulting thing – especially if he is no longer allowed to stay on our insurance until age 26, which is another ACA protection that’s currently in jeopardy.

  • This could happen to you.

This could very well be a letter to myself a few years ago. Before L, I had very little real understanding of what lifetime limits or denial of coverage based on pre-existing conditions could actually mean in practice. For anyone reading this who may be unfamiliar with our story, I was a healthy, active, 28-year-old expectant mother doing all the right things and experiencing a textbook pregnancy – until my son arrived very suddenly at 34 weeks with an undetected, randomly-occurring congenital defect that ultimately cost him most of his small intestine. He spent more than four months in the NICU before coming home, and while he is currently a happy, smart, well-adjusted preschooler with a bright future, he has needed significant medical and nutritional support his entire life, including a feeding tube and a central line, to ensure that future remains possible for him.

If you think you’re safe because your insurance is employer-based, pay attention to these two regulations. They offer protection against crushing blows to real people. None of the statements I’ve just made is a revelation, or at least they shouldn’t be, but it’s very possible you may not have considered the real-life consequences of these things for people you actually know. For people you love. For you.

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2 thoughts on “America, we need to talk.

  1. Pingback: America, Let’s Talk: Mandated Healthcare Coverage and the AHCA | this gutsy life

  2. Pingback: Dear Jason Chaffetz: My iPhone isn’t going anywhere. | this gutsy life

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